Saturday, November 14, 2015

Where Do We Go From Here?


This is the only thing that makes sense to me today

This is not the kind of post you would expect from me, and just because I don't write about things like this certainly doesn't mean that I am not outraged by them, but I prefer to leave the commentary to those more articulate and informed.  

I don't think I need to be informed or terribly articulate to acknowledge just how fucked up parts of the world are these days, and what happened in Paris last night is just one example.  I have visited Paris - it is a beautiful city - while I am horrified at the killings that took place last night, I would be equally horrified were it to happen in any other city in the world.  Millions of #prayforParis hashtags are showing up on Instagram and Twitter today, but prayer isn't going to fix what happened, and it's not going to stop it from happening again.

And this is where I am at a loss - what has to happen for ISIS (if they are in fact responsible), or other terrorist groups to stop killing people in the name of whatever God they worship?  An emotional gut reaction that I'm sure many people are feeling today is probably along the lines of "Wipe them out", "bomb the shit out of Syria and Iraq".   Why not?  Because thousands of innocent people would be killed in the process, more would rise up to take their place, and because their beliefs are so twisted they would feel they died as martyrs.   Where do we go from here?   What weapon do you have against people who put so little value on human life.  Does anyone have any answers? 

Where Do We Go From Here?
 

13 comments:

  1. My daugther lives in Paris! I am glad she is all right :)

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  2. You have articulated my thoughts so well. I put up a happy post and then found out - so while I celebrate the joy of the post, completely unrelated to this event, how do I deal with the sadness and anger at the same time? This is part of the hideousness.

    After the Vancouver hockey riot many people wrote words of love and kindness on the boards over the smashed department store windows and that also made me feel empty - it felt like a show of sorts, a media happening, even though I'm sure there were many heartfelt sentiments as people struggled to find expression. How do you sort through this stuff?

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  3. Like Melanie, I can also say that you articulated my thoughts really well. I don't know what the answer is. I can share the following story:

    About thirteen years ago, I participated in a Jewish-Muslim Peace Walk in my city. We took most of a day to walk about 6 miles from a mosque to a synagogue. Many of other faiths participated too. I fell into step early in the walk with a lovely Somalian man, and we did not part company until we reached my synagogue. We chatted about all the similarities in our religions and communities, about the upcoming US presidential election (in which we both did not want to see the incumbent re-elected!), families and children, etc. Sometimes we just walked quietly in an easy companionship. At one of these quiet points, he turned to me and said, out of the blue, "I think that no one who is truly adhering to any religion in this world kills other people in the name of that religion. If they do, they are not true followers of their faith."

    Although the killings have not stopped, when I think of that moment, I have a little hope in my heart. I can still see Mahmoud's radiant smile clearly in my memory! But how do we deal with ISIS and other inhuman idealogues who are so bent on hatred and killing? I have no idea.

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  4. Religion and war seem to go hand in hand. Offering people hope is one thing. Offering paradise if they kill infidels is another entirely. I can't make sense of it and it makes me sad.

    Suzanne

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  5. there's no easy reply, no magical solution that can fix everything, and I agree about it.
    Desolation and uncertity are absolutely normal and that's the way almost everybody feel now. I think it's better to wait and reflect, indeed.
    besos

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  6. I have no answers but you have captured my feelings perfectly. Prayer (any religion) will not prevent these atrocities. It seems we have always had the hideous and unfeeling among us. I still do hold a scrap of hope for sanity and reason and solutions, but I feel overwhelmed now. xox

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  7. You've said it so well, Shelley. I'm brokenhearted at all the lives lost. How can people follow a religion so blindly?

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  8. I have no answer. I don't understand the destroyer mindset.

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  9. As I just commented on another blog post, I grew up with the shadow of the IRA. They committed terrible atrocities in Birmingham and the threat from them was prevalent for a large part of my life. We chose to fly to Mumbai three days after the awful terror attacks there. Its awful, its frightening but we can't give in or not live our lives the way we wish to or we're giving in to their insanity. xxx

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  10. I can't add anything to the banner in your photo really... Yet more desperate times. xxx

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  11. I'm an atheist but I think using a religion as an excuse for violence is deceitful. I stand with you.

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